Filmmaking
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Narcisse Pelletier
Film Collection


Narcisse Pelletier was at the forefront of Amateur filmmaking in North America. He was a founding member of the Toronto Amateur Movie Club and the Editor of their newspaper "Shots and Angles". He made a collection of short films based around his observations of nature and was also a writer, director and actor for his own film "The Tired Travellor".

In addition to his personal films, he contributed to other films including "The Highwayman" which is studied at great length in the book "Amateur Filmmaking: The Rise of North American Movie Making" by author Charles Tepperman.

A long standing subject of his films are his teachers: members of the Group of Seven and other important figures of the Canadian Art Community. There are reels of C.W. Jefferys, Franz Johnston and Frank Carmichael which are preserved for National interest by the Library & Archives of Canada.

The Picnic

In the film a group gets rained out during their picnic.

We are always at mercy to the whims of the natural world, yet through the experience the youths retire to a wood stove where their stockings are hung to dry and the sun emerges in the most beautiful purple tone. In the end they find a new experience together, equally enjoyable.

Among Flowers

Narcisse took a lot of inspiration from the rhythm of nature: the weather, the changes of the season and the shifts of the landscape.

The film shows Narcisse in his element, sketching among wild flowers.

The Highwayman

The first film adaptation of the famous poem of Alfred Noyes. The Highwayman was put together by the Toronto Amateur Movie club and was filmed at the Old Mill in Toronto, Ontario.
Narcisse played a soldier in the film, and was also a camera operator and cinematographer.

Self Portrait

A collection of reels of Narcisse Pelletier, including

slight of hand and stop motion techniques. It's a lighthearted selection showing Narcisse's sense of humour.

Shots of Friends

A Collection of reels including friends and family members. Including particularly sentimental footage from
Christmas 1935.